Announcing “The Wackiest Race” — Short Story RPG Adventure #1

Short Story RPG adventure #1: The Wackiest RaceIt’s finally here. The first adventure in the Short Story RPG library: “The Wackiest Race” is on sale now!

Graham Elliot of Denver weaves a nostalgia-soaked adventure through a world born out of love for 80s cartoons. One player takes on the role of ‘StoryMaster’, facilitating a collaborative storytelling experience with four other players, each of whom plays a member of the intrepid Channel 9 News team, investigating a mysterious letter which arrived at the station.

Check it out here!

“…Wait, but what is Short Story RPG!?”

For a long time, I’ve been of the opinion that tabletop role playing represents a really powerful and unique way to interact and bond with friends and family. People are being cheated of these experiences by imposing barriers to entry — from complex rules, to weird dice, time commitments, and too-nerdy genres. With Short Story RPG, I’m going to change that. Short Story RPG employs: very basic rules, dice you can borrow from your Monopoly set, stories you can complete in one sitting at a dinner party, and themes everyone can relate to reaching across all genres. I hope you’ll give it a try. Our first offering, “The Wackiest Race” involved a lot of work by a group of super talented individuals: Graham Elliot, Charles Reid, William Niebling, and Jared Diganci.

And this is just getting started — the production pipeline is built, and several adventures are currently underway. Make sure to get on the mailing list to get the early drop on new stories as they come out!

Woohoo!

 

Short Story RPG

An unexpected side benefit of sending off Valour to a publisher for evaluation, is that I got a chance to turn my focus to a project I’ve had cooking for a while but has been stalled (much to the chagrin of my collaborators) while I worked to push my board game across the finish line.

That project is Short Story RPG. I love tabletop role playing — it’s such a dynamic medium for human-to-human interaction, and a few dice and a little bit of imagination, you and your friends can spin a tale to rival many mainstream movies. Some of my fondest memories involve sessions of Dungeons & Dragons or Call of Cthulhu.

But those games have a problem. Two, actually: Firstly, while I understand that nerdy genres like high fantasy and sci-fi are gaining ground in public opinion, let’s face it… they’ve still got a long way to go. Ask a person on the street what they think of Dungeons & Dragons, and you might as well have said Dungeons & Dorks. Secondly, even those of us who are into such things have an entirely other problem: Scheduling. An ongoing tabletop RPG campaign requires coordinating the calendars of five or six people with jobs, other hobbies, possibly kids, etc. etc. etc. We’ve all been there, the group misses a session, then by the next session, half is spent catching everyone up on what was happening, then your mage has to leave early… Continue reading